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Lindal & Marton Parish Magazine 1898

Further spiritual guidance and village news from the Rev Lewis Owen Lewis.

Jan | Feb | Mar | Apr | May | Jun | Jul | Aug | Sep | Oct | Nov | Dec

Go to Parish Magazine 1897

January 1898

Dear Friends,

Our New Year's greeting must be the old one – "A Happy New Year to you all."

How easy to wish, how easy to say; but, like so many other good things, it does not come for the mere wishing of it. To secure it, very much will depend upon what each one does to gain and deserve it. No room for idlers or mere sentimentalists in that field. The harvest of good things must be reaped and gathered in by ourselves, or the good wishes of our friends will find and leave the garner empty. There can be no happiness without energy in a right direction.

To guide us, therefore, towards the end in view, what shall we do? Begin with ourselves – ask "What we are, and whose we are." Keep these two simple questions steadily in mind, begin the New Year with them before our eyes, and let them have the weight they deserve, and the days, weeks, and months of the year will put us in possession of real happiness all the journey through. Of course we all need help to secure that blessing, but what has been done for us to encourage us in the search for it? God has given us one seventh part of our time for rest and worship. In that we see provision made for physical, mental and spiritual recreation, and we need such continually.

Let me ask you then, dear reader, as you desire real happiness, to avail yourself of the Day of rest. Endeavour to be in God's house every Sunday when possible. Try and attend morning as well as evening service. Begin that day well and realize how much there is in a Sunday well spent. I do think the question of Sunday observance stands right at the head of true happiness, and as it is in your power to secure it, why not do so?

As another help, I would call your attention to our Bible Class, open to all, and we gladly welcome any who are wishful to spend an hour in trying to find out what is profitable to learn, and then take the lessons right into our daily life. Thus God's Word and God's Day are designed to be the means to a Happy New Year! The Bible Class is held every Monday evening at seven o'clock, and we cordially invite fresh members to meet with us on January 3rd, when the Class will be re-opened.

Our Band of Hope will be held on Tuesday, January 4th, when we hope our young friends will have provided material for a profitable and enjoyable evening. Endeavour to attend these meetings, and encourage those who are trying to alleviate the wrongs and sorrows entailed by the enormous amount spent in intoxicating drink each year, and so try and secure what we all wish one another "A Happy New Year."

Marriage

Dec. 15 – Peter Thompson and Agnes Hannah Stanberry, Lindal.

Text for the Month

“I WILL DWELL IN THEM AND WALK WITH THEM; AND I WILL BE THEIR GOD, AND THEY SHALL BE MY PEOPLE.”
2 Cor. 6, 16.

Yours faithfully,
L. OWEN LEWIS.

February 1898

Dear Friends,

Holiday season is over once more, Schools are re-opened, and Teachers and Scholars are busy at work. Thus we are reminded of the steady, onward march of time. It seems quite a long while since Christmas, and if time be measured by events the days would appear to be much longer than they are. So much continually being done, the whole world brought under notice in the daily newspaper, makes it impossible to keep pace with what is going on, and the days are all too short to accomplish what we would like to do. But the days go on, and one season succeeds another very rapidly. Nothing hinders time!

I take this opportunity of returning our most hearty thanks for all the kind help given towards making our Christmas Tree so successful. The various articles sent in were much appreciated, and the whole passed off in a most pleasant manner.

And now we are looking forward, ever forward, for this month brings us Candlemas with its lengthening of days and anticipated changes in many homes. In former times all signs of Christmas decorations were put away on the eve of February 2nd, the real Candlemas day. Evergreens were allowed to remain in Church and home until that date and then carefully burned. Candlemas day was supposed to have much to do with the weather following it, one old rhyme speaking thus: –

"If Candlemas day be dry and fair,
The half of winter's to come and mair;
If Candlemas day be wet and foul,
The half of winter's gane at Yule."

Here, then, is a chance for observers of the weather, and who does not like to be weather-wise.

But February also brings Shrove Tuesday and Ash Wednesday; days that were of much more importance in ages gone by than now, but still kept up by great numbers who pass from the gay to the grave without much thought as to their former significance. The first day of Lent will this year be on Wednesday, the 23rd, and endeavours will be made to bring home to the minds of the people the meaning of the forty days set apart by the Church for special meditation on the reality, power of, and the remedy for sin.

This is the month when all pruning and planting of trees should be done, if not already accomplished, and preparation of ground for all early crops of vegetables. Such plants as pansies, violas, carnations and roses should be put into their places in which they are to flower, when weather permits. And thus with longer and brighter days there will be much to do; let our motto be "What is worth doing is worth doing well."

I again call attention to our Bible Class and Band of Hope, both of which I earnestly commend to your consideration and prayers.

Baptism

Jan. 9 – Nellie, daughter of Charles and Rachel Christian, Lindal.

Death

Jan. 6 – The Reverend J. M. Morgan, for nearly 50 years Vicar of Dalton.

Text for the Month

“I HAVE SET BEFORE YOU LIFE AND DEATH – THEREFORE CHOOSE LIFE!”
Deuty. 30, 19.

Yours faithfully,
L. OWEN LEWIS.

March 1898

Dear Friends,

March is here! How much is suggested by that word! The beginning of spring, when all Nature is quickened into growth, and the apparent deadness which has prevailed for some time gives way to returning life and beauty.

Field and garden, hedgerow and grove, animal and vegetable, all proclaim the great change going on, and for which preparation has continually been made though unseen by human eyes.

The roots of plants and trees have been very busy, quietly preparing for the swelling of buds and the bursting forth of flowers, and every bright day now makes manifest how much has been done for the benefit and blessing of man.

The winter season has been a very remarkable one. Scarcely any frost or snow, but continued open, damp and foggy weather.

Who will not remember the winter of 1898? Sickness in one form or another, especially that of influenza, has been almost universal, and it will be some time yet ere the legacy left by that most trying complaint is paid off. Nor has it been sickness only, but sorrow on account of the death of several.

Accident has once more robbed the wife of her husband, and the child of its father. Death came and summoned him from his work into the realities of the unseen. The old man of 86 has been called away to rejoin his aged partner, separated from him only a short time since. The mother snatched away from husband and boy, leaving a gap so hard to fill. The elderly matron, after years of struggle and anxiety, could stay no longer. The young maiden, in the flush and joy of life, suddenly called away to a higher and brighter existence.

It is not often, thank God, that we are called upon to record such a list of departures, to bear in mind what trouble and sorrow death always entails. And what is the meaning of it all to us who are left behind for a time? Is it all to pass away as a troubled dream, or shall we wisely permit it to abide and work in as more thought, more seriousness of life, more peace of mind flowing from that pardon which the Saviour, Jesus, alone can give. May He extend healing power to all in our parish and district who are still weak and ill, and give us all the spirit and words of praise for His goodness to us.

Baptism

Feb. 13 – Ellen, daughter of Robert and Annie Jackson, Marton.

Deaths

Jan. 22 – Thomas Jackson, Round Hill, Marton, aged 26 years.
Feb. 1 – Joseph Wilson, Marton, aged 86 years.
Feb. 10 – Isabella Tomlinson, Ulverston Road, aged 40 years.
Feb. 15 – Grace Thomas, Lindal, aged 69 years.
Feb. 17 – Mary Loosemore, Lorne Terrace, aged 20 years.

Text for the Month

“MAN GOETH TO HIS LONG HOME, AND THE MOURNERS GO ABOUT THE STREETS”
Ecclesiastes 12, 5.

Yours faithfully,
L. OWEN LEWIS.

April 1898

My Dear Friends,

Easter Sunday is now close upon us, and many are looking forward to it. It becomes us to ask ourselves as to what use we are going to make of it? It is a season which may be, and will be, to every one of us, either very helpful of just the opposite. If we accept it, as it is intended, as a season full of the deepest spiritual blessings, then very much good will result, and we shall be better men, women, neighbours, and servants of our Lord and Master. If we allow ourselves to be carried away by the stream of worldly pleasure, we shall be neither one nor the other. Upon the Resurrection of Jesus depends yours and mine! Every Easter brings with it a tremendous responsibility. We have to give an account of each one, how it found us, how it left us, what use we made of it! To ensure His Resurrection there must have been death and burial! Do we think of what it cost Him to pay the debt of sin, our sin? If so, surely the day for observing that death cannot lightly be passed over. We owe more to Jesus than to all earthly friends. Yet we would not like to spend the yearly memorial of their death and burial, as a holiday full of worldly pleasure! Think, then, of Jesus and Good Friday, of Jesus and Easter Sunday. Opportunities will, please God, be given for doing so in the Services of our Church, Morning and Evening of both days. Try and attend them; they may be the last on earth for any one of us!

Let me plead for a large attendance at Holy Communion on Easter Sunday. May I ask some, yea, all who read these words, not only to attend themselves, but to kindly invite others, especially the young people of our district. Many of them rarely, if ever, go to the Lord's Table. Having been confirmed and solemnly promised they would do so, they have become careless and carried away by temptation to become very negligent of their highest and best interests. A word from you might be a turning point in their history; in God's name try and make it so.

While I am writing this, we have the Church Army Officers working with us. It is too soon to make any remarks upon the results of their work, but not too soon to thank those who have already been kind to them. I hope to be able to record that a lasting blessing has rested upon what they are doing.

We have been painfully reminded of the uncertainty of life by the sad accident to one of our neighbours in South Africa. Remember the widow and her dear children in your prayers, that they may be spared, and be a blessing to each other.

Eastertide reminds us of Life, of Victory, of the World to come, and our Future Home.

Marriages

Feb. 23 – Harold Bernard Rodda and Alice Ann Gilchrist.
Mar. 2 – George Dodd and Gertrude Grimes.

Deaths

Feb. 16 – Richard Dixon, Boxburg, South Africa, aged 40 years.
Mar. 12 – Jane Gilchrist, Lindal, aged 45 years.

Text for the Month

“JESUS OUR LORD, WHO WAS DELIVERED UP FOR OUR OFFENCES, AND WAS RAISED AGAIN FOR OUR JUSTIFICATION.”
Romans 4, 24-5.

Yours faithfully,
L. OWEN LEWIS.

May 1898

My Dear Friends,

"It is a good thing to give thanks unto the Lord."

This month's address must be one of praise and thanksgiving. We have received so many marks of God's favour during the past few weeks that I cannot let the Magazine appear without asking you to join with me in heartiest praise for all we have received at His hands. We must thank Him for all the good received during the Church Army Mission in our Parish. It was indeed a time of good to many, and the beginning of better things we trust to us all. How much of the good seed sown lies, as yet, in a dormant state in the hearts of our people we cannot say, but the first-fruits have been presented; let us pray for a rich and abundant harvest as the result. I am sure we are all ready to testify to the godly zeal and labours of Captain Jermy during his short stay with us, and should he be permitted to visit us again, we shall be glad to welcome him very warmly.

Then we thank God for putting it into the hearts of so many to willingly offer hospitality to the Officers of the Van. It was a mark of appreciation of the work being done for the Master, and His words will not be forgotten - "Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren, ye have done it unto Me!" However trifling the gift, yet given in the right spirit, it will never be forgotten, never lose its reward.

Again, we thank God for the spirit of desire to do something for His name on behalf of others, which has manifested itself since the Army Mission. The little Tea Meeting was quite a success in every way, and helped to unite us in fellowship and good works. The "Endeavour" Society which sprang out of it has afforded an opportunity for continuing that visible unity which has been the strength of all good work, and is so much needed amongst us. The meetings will be held, please God, every Monday evening at 7 o'clock in the New School, and we shall be very pleased to welcome any who are willing to do ever so little for Christ's sake.

Yet once more, we must praise God for such a successful Easter Day. We had a larger number of communicants than last year, and the appeals made during the day, on behalf of our Sunday School Fund for prize books for the scholars, were responded to in such a manner as to remove any difficulty in providing rewards to continue the pleasing custom established many years ago. The children will receive their rewards on the afternoon of Whit-Sunday.

We thank God for increased attendances at our Sunday Morning Services, and pray that many more may be stirred up to avail themselves of the means of grace provided at both services.

At the Vestry Meeting the Churchwardens were able to present their yearly accounts and to shew a small balance on the right side.

All these things call for praise for mercies received, and we sincerely thank all who have in any way contributed to such a pleasant state of things.

May we all be mindful of God's goodness, and be led in the way of humility and prayer, so that our lives may be continuous witnesses for Him who has done so much for us.

Baptism

April 10 - William, son of William and Isabella Jackson, Marton.

Death

April 13 - Rachel Gertrude Brockbank, Melton Terrace, aged 18 months.

Text for the Month

"O THAT MEN WOULD PRAISE THE LORD FOR HIS GOODNESS, AND FOR HIS WONDERFUL WORKS TO THE CHILDREN OF MEN."
Psalm 107, 31.

Yours faithfully,
L. OWEN LEWIS.

June 1898

My Dear Friends,

It is the season of Whitsuntide once more, and Whitsuntide has always been associated with the gathering together of multitudes of people. If we go back to the early ages of Christianity, we can read of the way in which Whitsuntide was kept and the origin of the name. Whitsunday was looked forward to, then, as well as now, but with far different motives. It was the one great day in the year when the newly baptized were gathered together and clad in white garments, emblematical of the purity of life they were expected, and had promised, to live. The young people, wearing their white garments, walked in procession, accompanied by great numbers of parents and friends, and thus proclaimed themselves witnesses for Christ. Their pleasures were of the simplest and most innocent character, endeavouring to keep their lives, as their garments, pure in the sight of their Master.

To how great an extent the meaning and intention of Whitsuntide has been changed can easily be seen. The world has laid hold of the holy day and perverted it into a season of worldly amusements. Let anyone witness the great multitudes of people, of all ages, who assemble at different centres, at the world's bidding, to spend one day in its service, to purchase its pleasures at the cost of time, money, and alas often of character, and contrast such service with that of ancient times, when Whitsuntide was observed according to its institution, and then say which is better. Thank God the better way is still attainable.

It is a great source of gratitude to know that our Endeavour Meetings continue to be so well attended. I think those who spend an hour on Monday evening in our Sunday School will testify with me that such meetings are very restful, very helpful, and refreshing. In due time I have no doubt some of our members will be prompted by God's Spirit to take an active part in reading and prayer, and so make it manifest that the good seed sown is bearing fruit in the formation of character and life consecrated to the service of our Lord and Master. We hope to continue the meetings all the summer, and so amidst all the unrest and manifold changes of the present age, we may have a centre of meeting at which God's peace may be enjoyed and our souls refreshed, and fitted for any change that may come upon us.

I am thankful to record continued improvement in our Sunday School. With the present staff of teachers, aided by the Spirit of God, we ought to see much good and many blessings to those who teach and those who are taught.

On Sunday, June 19th, the annual collections will be made on behalf of the Ulverston and District Cottage Hospital. I ask for a very liberal response to the appeal to be made on that day.

Baptisms

May 1 - Sidney, son of Thomas William and Esther Pattinson, Lindal.
May 22 - Herbert, son of William and Ada Marshall, Lindal.

Deaths

April 21 - Esther Airey, Marton, after long and painful suffering, borne with exemplary patience and comforted with Christ's presence, aged 19 years.
April 30 - John Sinkinson, Round Hill, aged 78 years.
May 1 - Robert Garth, Lindal, aged 46 years.

Text for the Month

"WHEN THOU PASSEST THROUGH THE WATERS I WILL BE WITH THEE."
Isaiah 43, 2.

Yours faithfully,
L. OWEN LEWIS.

July 1898

My Dear Friends,

The "Longest Day" has come and gone, and has given us warning that the summer is fast hastening on. Whatever the weather may be, days and nights go on, and are ever bringing us nearer the end of the year and nearer to eternity. When we look on the marvellous beauty of field and garden at this time of the year, who would not like it to continue as it is for a long time? Yet, we know that change is going on and the season will soon pass away, and the beauty and fertility of to-day will rapidly assume another aspect. And as this continual change goes on, how many mercies are we receiving day by day! Amidst all changes our Heavenly Father changes not! He still continues faithful, and as he spares is ever asking us to observe His love as manifested in His works and word. In the bright sunny days of summer may we be more and more reminded of the "Sun of Righteousness, the True Light of the world!" May the rays of His love shine upon us, and enter our hearts, that we may rejoice in that Light which can alone bring us true cheer in the pathway of life.

We are reminded of the unwisdom there is in putting off the present opportunity by the sudden removal of one of our well-known neighbours. His work in mine and garden is over, and his well-known form will be seen here no more.

I am very thankful to again report the good progress of our "Endeavour" Meetings. The attendances have been most encouraging, real summer weather inside, and warmth of hearth and speech have been wonderfully realized, and there is every reason to bless God for His goodness towards us. We have been fortunate in having had such cheering and valuable help from kind visitors and friends; and I am sure we all derived much blessing from the words of Mr. Tebbs, Captain Jermy, Mr. Sherwin and Mr. Clarke, either of whom we shall be very glad to welcome again at no distant date. We are hoping to have a second address on "Precious stones" from that most earnest worker for the Master, Miss Cowherd, who, with her sister, is ever ready to do all they can to instruct in the way of Life. Notice will be given of their visit to our Parish, and I feel sure their kindness will be much valued. May I ask your remembrance before the Throne of Grace of all good work going on in our midst, and that God will bless it to our people.

Baptisms

May 29 - Lucy Mashiter, daughter of Samuel and Margaret Atkinson, Leeds.
June 12 - Bernard, son of Robert and Hannah Newby, Tunnell Cottages, Dalton.
June 19 - Frederick Gilbert, son of William and Annie Brocklebank, Lindal Moor.

Marriages

June 1 - Robert Marshall to Elizabeth Mary Lowther, both of Lindal.
June 1 - William Siddle, of Morecambe, to Mary Alice Helme, of Lindal.
June 23 - Robert Callagan, of Dalton, to Isabella Dixon, of Lindal.

Death

June 3 - William Dixon, Lindal, aged 60 years.

Text for the Month

"LET MY SOUL LIVE, AND IT SHALL PRAISE THEE; AND LET THY JUDGEMENTS HELP ME."
Psalm 119, 175.

Yours faithfully,
L. OWEN LEWIS.

August 1898

Dear Friends,

In ancient mythology, we find pictures representing all kinds of things which were thought to be of interest to mortals here below. These pictures were intended to teach the people of matters supposed to be very important to them. In ages when there was no printing press, no literature as in the present, we can understand to some extent how popular, and in some instances how useful, such illustrations may have been. One of such was used to represent Time. It was that of an old man with wings, a scythe in his hand, and a solitary lock of hair in his forehead. I call your attention to only one feature of this figure, that lock of hair on his brow. The flight of time is very rapid, and the only chance for man is to lay hold of present opportunities, to take hold of that lock of hair and not let the old man pass by unheeded or unimproved; he may not give you another chance. But why make these remarks? We have reached the month of August, and that means that seven months of this year have gone from us for ever.

The old man has moved on quietly, rapidly, but surely the months have passed away. What have they brought us? What use of the time thus given to us have we made? It has brought many blessings. Think of the beautiful and suitable weather for gathering in the hay harvest. Our hearts and lips should be full of praise for such goodness. Have we been thankful as we ought to have been? Time and mercy have been ours, given to us by our Gracious Father.

Again I have grateful pleasure in recording the continued success of our "Endeavour" Meetings, and ask your earnest prayers for a blessing to rest upon them. It has been most remarkable how kind friends have turned in to help us, and often so unexpectedly. The Master knows what we need, and has been so good to us.

Our Choir and Teachers' Trip to Morecambe was again provided for us by the same kind friends who have so often ministered to our pleasure in years gone by. We pray that much interest may be taken in the work of the Church and Sunday School by everyone who enjoyed the lovely day at Morecambe on July 16th.

We are hoping to have our Sunday School Treat early this month.

The one thought uppermost in our mind just now is the Demonstration on Bank Holiday. We anticipate a great number of people coming to Lindal on that day, and pray that God may make it a time of blessing to us all.

Baptism

July 3 - Bell, daughter of Stephen and Mary Carr, Orgrave Mill, Dalton.

Deaths

July 20 - Ann Ormrod, Lindal, aged 76 years.
July 24 - Robert Hoggarth, Ulverston Road, aged 7 years.

Text for the Month

"THOU ART A GRACIOUS AND MERCIFUL GOD."
Neh. 9, 31.

Yours faithfully,
L. OWEN LEWIS.

September 1898

My Dear Friends,

In last month's Magazine we were anticipating the Church Army Van Demonstration, to be held on Bank Holiday. We have now to thank God for His mercies to us and to so many others for giving us such a fine day as we had. That day will be long remembered by us in Lindal as one which gave us an opportunity of seeing such a number of people meeting together with one object in view. Let me here make it quite plain what that object was, and how it was accomplished. The Carlisle Diocesan Van No. 2, which had been working for many months in parishes around us, was becoming much worse for wear. At its best it was only a secondhand one when purchased for its present purpose. Unlike the more modern Vans, it was very heavy, and in many ways was most inconvenient, when we realize that it has to form the home for all purposes for two or three men. Captain Jermy feeling how uncomfortable for himself and his Cadets the Van was, desired to make some alterations as well as necessary repairs. The question was, how, when, and where the work was to be done. After much thought our Parish was fixed upon as the centre for the Demonstration and Tea in connection with the event. Lindal was not expected, nor asked to raise the money needed, but as a centre for that purpose, it possesses advantages over many other villages. There are the School, the Green, and the Church, all conveniently situated and most suitable for the purpose. These were asked for, and kindly granted for the day. A number of Parishes in which the Van had worked were asked to help, and no less than 24 responded to the appeal made! They helped us and we helped them to secure the money needed, and I am sure neither they nor we feel any poorer for doing what we did. And now we are looking for a return of the Van in all its glory to receive its complement of furniture, &c., prior to leaving for more good work in neighbouring Parishes.

Our next pleasurable anxiety is that of Harvest Festival, on Sunday, October 2nd, and we shall as usual be thankful to receive help for the decorating of our Church on that day.

I am very thankful to again record the success of our "Endeavour Meetings." We have much reason to thank God for blessing us as He has done.

Baptisms

July 31 - William Ernest, son of John and Catherine Hartley, Lindal.
August 20 - William Henry, son of William John and Margaret McCoy, Chatburn, Lancashire.
August 21 - Mary Elizabeth, daughter of Henry Cook and Mary Eleanor Langhorne, Scalebeck.

Text for the Month

"LIFT UP YOUR EYES, AND LOOK ON THE FIELDS; FOR THEY ARE WHITE ALREADY TO HARVEST."
John 4, 35.

Yours faithfully,
L. OWEN LEWIS.

October 1898

My Dear Friends,

The season for Harvest Thanksgiving has once more returned, and all around us, Churches and Chapels, have been filled with large audiences anxious to see and hear what was being done. We may ask ourselves, "What is the meaning of it all?" Not surely beautiful decorations or attractive music only; but thanksgiving - praise and gratitude! These terms imply something received by ourselves from someone else!

If from an earthly benefactor we should feel uncomfortable if we did not show some return for help received; we would do our best, however humble, to make it seem that we did appreciate his kindness; how much more, then, should it be, when we remember how entirely dependent we are upon the bounties our our God, of which we are so forcibly reminded at Harvest Festival.

He has given us splendid crops of hay, and sent such weather that they were gathered in with so little trouble that 1898 will be remembered as a year of abundant provision for cattle.

And now the fields, lately so beautiful in their golden brown dress, have been cleared of their burden of grain, and all is safely garnered ready for the use of man.

Our Harvest Festival on the first Sunday of this month affords a fitting opportunity for shewing our gratitude to the Author and Giver of all good things. Let that be the object of our attending the services of that day; and let us offer Him for His worship what we can, as freely as we can, and as joyfully as we can, "For God loveth a cheerful giver."

And now the shortening of the days reminds that the season of our winter work must be begun. Our Band of Hope needs helpers, and there is a field opened out for good and most useful labour. Do not say, "I cannot do anything," but when the meetings begin attend them, and shew that your sympathy is with us in that work. Do not be guilty of trying to kill the work of others by never going near to see what is being done. May God stir up the hearts of all who love and care for children to take a personal interest in our Band of Hope work.

We shudder when we read of the barbarity of the Dervishes of the Soudan, or of the doings of the Mohammedans in Crete, Armenia, and elsewhere; they slay their thousands, but Drink its ten thousands. The man slayer, the woman slayer, the robber and corrupter of our children is busy in our land securing his victims daily, and we, what are we doing to fight and overcome him?

Remember our "Endeavour" meetings on Monday evenings at 7 o'clock.

The Church Army Van will pay us another visit for a fortnight, beginning on the 8th of this month. It will in all probability be two years ere we can have that privilege again. Let us make the very best of the opportunity.

Baptisms

Aug. 25 - Tom, son of Thomas and Hannah Margaret Slater, Lindal.
Sept. 11 - John Charles, son of Robert and Eliza Ann Wilkinson, Marton.

Death

Sept. 6th - Sarah Lowther, Lindal, aged 45 years.

Text for the Month

"HE WILL GATHER THE WHEAT INTO HIS GARNER."
Luke 3, 17.

Yours faithfully,
L. OWEN LEWIS.

November 1898

My Dear Friends,

This must be our Thanksgiving Number, for have we not had much cause to be thankful?

In connection with our Harvest Festival there is so much to be grateful for. First, our heartfelt thanks are due, and, I trust, have been given, to our Heavenly Father for His bountiful goodness in rewarding the labour and anxiety of those who tilled, ploughed, sowed, and harvested the abundant crops of all kinds. It was in all probability such an occasion that prompted the Psalmist to say, "Oh that men would praise the Lord for His goodness, and for his wonderful works to the children of men!"

Then we must thank Him for disposing the hearts of so many to help us so willingly during the Thanksgiving services. Kind friends, old and new, both in and out of the parish, vied with each other in their liberality towards making our Church representative of God's goodness. The contributions of plants, corn, fruit, flowers and vegetables were never more abundant, nor more beautiful, and it was the expressed opinion of all who saw the result that the decorations were even more chaste and striking than at any other Festival.

To all who assisted in arranging the decorations our heartiest thanks are given. They were a happy band of earnest and tasteful workers, and the Churchwardens and myself are well pleased in having had such helpers.

Again, we owe very hearty thanks to the preachers at the services. Plain, practical sermons were preached, and it is our own fault if we are not the better for them. To the Choir and the Lindal Moor Band we also tender our sincere thanks for doing their part so willingly towards the successful services of the day.

There is one other cause for gratitude which we must not lose sight of, namely, the Collections. These were larger, by a small sum, than on any former Thanksgiving in the history of our Church. It is a cause for great thankfulness that our Churchwardens can look the coming winter in the face with such composure as to the means being supplied for the warming and lighting of God's house for the services of the cold and dark season now upon us. We owe our warmest thanks to a tried and kind neighbour for a supply of oil, and trust he may be rewarded for his goodness.

Then there is the harvest of souls being gathered in through the work of the Church Army Van. Of this we cannot speak now, but only say, "Praise the Lord for his goodness."

Baptism

Sept. 25 - Arthur, son of Charlie and Mary Attenborough, Carnforth.

Marriages

Sept. 22 - John James Lindsay and Margaret Ann Watson, Lindal.
Oct. 8 - William Henry Williams and Emily Wilson, Lindal.

Deaths

Sept. 27 - Mary McPherson, Marton, aged 42 years.
Oct. 9 - Tom Slater, Lindal, aged 2 months.

Text for the Month

"I WILL MENTION THE LOVING KINDNESSES OF THE LORD."
Isaiah 63, 7.

Yours faithfully,
L. OWEN LEWIS.

December 1898

My Dear Friends,

We have now reached the last month of this year! Eleven months out of the twelve have gone by for ever! It is not too late, thank God, for us to ask ourselves, "How have I spent the past?" Are we quite satisfied we have done all we might have done for the betterment of our own lives and of those around us? If not, let us set to at once and "Redeem the time," for it may be very short.

Our friends of the Church Army Van have been having a good time at Newby Bridge. They have had a five days' Mission in the large room at the Swan Hotel, and every kindness has been shewn them there. The Van will be at Allithwaite until December 3rd, and then move on to Lindale-in-Cartmel. Let us follow it in its wanderings with our prayers for a rich blessing to rest upon its work.

I have now to report a fresh experience in our Parish work. We have had a Rummage Sale! and I suppose the memory of it is fresh in the minds of numbers of our people. The object of that Sale was to purchase lamps for the better lighting of our Parish Church. It is a great pleasure to the Churchwardens and myself to say that the Sale was an unqualified success, and has given us the means of providing, so far, all that is necessary for needed improvements. We here tender our most hearty thanks to all who so readily and generously contributed to so good an object.

To all the workers, especially the women, who gave such impetus to the movement that its success was secured in so short a time, especial thanks are due and given. May we all have the privilege of seeing the improved light, and may it be useful in helping us and many others to see "That True Light" which can alone cause us to perceive the Love He has to us.

Martinmas has come and gone! It brought with it a large share of fog, rain, and dirt; but there was, as usual, good cheer provided in our School for those who cared to partake of it.

Our Annual Tea and Entertainment was well patronised, and a very pleasant time we had.

We are deeply indebted to our kind friends from Dalton for such substantial help, and they have our sincere thanks for their kindness.

The Season of Advent is now here, and Christmas follows very rapidly. Both seasons remind us of our Master and the work He has done, and is going to do!

Think of Jesus and His Love!
Think of Jesus and His Coming again!

I should be pleased to receive new subscribers for our Magazine, so as to begin the New Year with increased numbers.

May God Grant to every one of us a "REAL HAPPY CHRISTMAS."

Baptisms

Oct. 26 - Agnes Hilda, daughter of William and Elizabeth Gibson, Lindal.
Nov. 6 - Annie, daughter of James and Sarah Hutchinson, Snipe Gill.

Marriage

Nov. 16 - Thomas Hockin and Mary Jane Gibson, Lindal.

Death

Oct. 29 - Thomas Hodgson, Marton, aged 70 years.

Text for the Month

"LAY HOLD ON ETERNAL LIFE."
1 Timothy 6, 19.

Yours faithfully,
L. OWEN LEWIS.

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